Nerdual Reality – Demonstration Games

You’ve bought your VR system, set it up, maybe upgraded your computer, and now you’ve downloaded and played a lot of the free experiences that act as an introduction to VR. They’re quite fun, if a bit short, but now you face the question of what to do next. The answer is to invite round friends and family and show off those same introductory experiences to them as well. Because you’d told them that you bought a VR system, and now you have to prove that it wasn’t a huge waste of money.

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Review: Telltale’s Marvel’s Guardians of the Galaxy Episode 1: Tangled up in a Long Title

After a few stumbles in their latest outings, Telltale’s Marvel’s Guardians of the Galaxy Episode 1: Tangled up in Blue (“GOTG” from here on out) harks back to their last truly excellent offering of Tales From the Borderlands, with the familiar action-comedy setting of the latter to tell… a tale.

These things are episodic, so any review at this point may not be necessarily useful. For what it’s worth though – it’s pretty good. If you’re a fan of Telltale experiences or Guardians of the Galaxy, then you’ll probably enjoy this, as I certainly did.

However, there’s enough here to get me pedantically analysing the thing, and that’s always fun!

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Nerdual Reality – Introduction

Welcome to the first of a series of articles about my travels throughout the wild landscape of VR. I have owned a VR headset since June last year and in that time I have amassed a library of dozens of games and played a hundred hours of some of the most unique gameplay you can have on the PC. Needless to say that these articles will reflect my own personal experiences with this technology, so if you feel I have disparaged your favourite game then feel free to call me an idiot in the comments. Without further ado, it’s time to jack in!

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One Week with the Switch: Thoughts & More Thoughts on Portable Gaming

Last week, I picked up a lovely neon-coloured Nintendo Switch. It’s the first time I’ve bought a console so close to launch, and I’m usually more pragmatic before committing to purchasing a piece of hardware, but two things about the console really made me want to check it out. The first was the positive response surrounding Zelda: Breath of the Wild. While it sounded like a fun adventure game in it’s own right, I became very interested after hearing conversations about the different systems of the game interacting in interesting ways. I’m a Zelda fan, and it sounded like a good Zelda game. Secondly, I bought a New 3DS about two years ago, and I really love it. The Switch, while touted as a console/handheld hybrid, seemed to me to be primarily a handheld, and that made me want to check it out more so than it being a TV console. Also, and perhaps the main reason that tipped me over to buying the Switch, is that I’m 30 and my wife and I don’t have children. We can afford to buy toys for ourselves sometimes.

Initially I had been very skeptical of the Switch. It looked to me to be something that would have been popular and cutting-edge back in 2012. From the 720p screen with large screen-bezels, to reports of 30 fps caps and limited internet functionality in the typical vein of out-of-touch Nintendo; this seemed very much to be portable technology that had been left in the dust years ago by the mobile phone and tablet industry. On announcement of the Switch, I thought that everyone already had something better; whether that be the 1080p smart devices in most of our pockets, the 2K/IPS tablets many people use on a daily basis, or our consoles and/or PCs already attached either to giant TVs or LCD panels on our desks. Nintendo has it’s dedicated fans, but what about the Switch would make the general public want to buy it?

However, the biggest revelation for me was actually using the Switch for the first time, and realising how forward thinking its central design actually is. This is a device that I want all my other devices in the future to model themselves after. Except for the use of Friend Codes. Oh, Nintendo!

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The Only Winning Move

This article contains spoilers for Spec Ops: The Line and early spoilers for Undertale

In my previous article I compare the actions-with-consequences that are forced upon you by two games: the excellent Spec Ops: The Line and the amusing Accounting. These are actions that garner much criticism from the games’ characters but are outside the control of the player – they are the only options presented and the game doesn’t proceed until you take them. I tried to argue that being criticised for such forced decisions in Accounting is annoying but it is tolerable (and maybe laudable) in Spec Ops because it fully embraces this theme as a means to empathise with the protagonist. In Spec Ops you play the tunnel-visioned Captain Walker who sees no alternatives to his actions and stubbornly forges onward without considering the bigger picture. The game’s story introduces tragedies that are then the result of this obstinance and openly blames Captain Walker for them. Spec Ops then goes further by telling Walker (and perhaps also the player) that these hideous consequences could have been avoided if only he “just stopped”. But what does this mean in gameplay terms?

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Don’t Blame Me – I Had No Choice!

An irresponsible splurge recently had me picking up one of those HTC Vives and so I’ve been lost in a wonderland of Virtual Reality. I’ll write up an article some time about my experiences with VR but for now I’d like to write about one particular game, the recently-released Accounting by William Pugh (of Stanley Parable) and Justin Roiland (of Rick and Morty). Don’t consider this to be a review, but rather a jumping off point for a discussion about decision-making and player responsibility in games. Actually, no wait, I’ll give a short one-sentence review of Accounting right now. It’s very entertaining and terribly fun, but I don’t know if I would even call it a game.

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